Florida primary gives Romney a boost, Paul and Santorum falling behind.

Today Florida primary is going to make a lot of Texan's disappointed as Ron Paul has a poor showing and Romney pulls ahead. Listening to the buzz around Texas, on the radios and talking to people, I've found very few tend to like Romney, but many are hard core Paul supporters. The rest seem to mostly favor Gingrich or Santorum. Tea Partyers will also not be pleased.
AP via Google Search
The Florida primary is a winner takes all state, and with Romney getting just short of half the votes, he gets another 50 pledged delegates leaving the totals as follows:
Still this is a far cry from the 1144 required to get the nomination, and not even half of the 155 delegates that Texas has to offer. Yet the Texas primary is still not for another two months, if the new districts can be determined by then. Some specific dates to look forward to are listed below:
  • Feb. 4 Nevada caucus, Maine caucus begins (through Feb. 11)
  • Feb. 7 Colorado and Minnesota caucuses, Missouri primary
  • Feb. 11 Maine presidential caucus ends
  • Feb. 22 Republican debate in Mesa, Arizona
  • Feb. 28 Arizona and Michigan primaries
  • March 1 Republican debate in Georgia
  • March 3 Washington caucuses
  • March 6 “Super Tuesday” primaries and caucuses, including: Ohio, Massachusetts, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Idaho, Alaska, and North Dakota.
  • March 19 Republican debate in Portland, Oregon
  • April 3 District of Columbia, Maryland, Texas, and Wisconsin Primaries.
  • June 5 California, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota, and New Jersey Primaries.
  • Aug. 27-30 Republican convention in Tampa, Florida
  • Sept. 3-6 Democratic convention, Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Oct. 3 Presidential debate in Denver, Colorado
  • Oct. 11 Vice presidential debate in Danville, Kentucky
  • Oct. 16 Presidential debate in Hempstead, New York
  • Oct. 22 Presidential debate in Boca Raton, Florida
  • Nov. 6 Election Day

Low income housing in Sachse TX may threaten home prices and stress ISDs funding

The developer VDC Sachse Reserve I, LLC recently sent out notices to the City of Sachse and the Wylie Independent School District states that VDC is making application for the Housing Tax Credit Program (HTCP) and HOME Program with the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA) for Woodbridge Estates: an apartment community comprised of approximately 100 units, of which 100% will be for low-income tenants. Word has got out about this notice, as it was forwarded on by the WISD to all the PTA presidents and principals in WISD, and then on to many residents of the Woodbridge HOA

The initial zoning for the property in question was approved in January 2002 for commercial and some apartment units, which more recently has been considered for a Wal-Mart and now low income housing. In both cases residents of the Woodbridge HOA have voiced concerns that it could have a negative impact on property values. The expected 200 kids to live in the low income housing could overload the WISD with additional expenses and no additional funding due to a lack of property taxes. There are also concerns about discouraging new businesses from coming to the area.

On the proponent side, these 200 kids would be given an opportunity to attend a highly rated school district. Giving their families a place to live that otherwise could not afford it, in a community with may good opportunities and amenities. Sachse City certainly has a number of neighborhoods already that are somewhat rundown with low cost housing, although well displaced from the Woodbridge area, this new development would be right next door. Still it begs the question as to if property values would really be hurt that drastically or at all.

The land owner, and HOA developer Don Herzog sent out a note, after last week’s Woodbridge Association meeting stating, "I was asked to report on this morning’s meetings with the multifamily developer, the City of Sachse and the Wylie Independent School District. I shared the concerns raised at last night’s Board meeting with all. As a result of these meetings, the multifamily developer is evaluating whether or not to proceed with his application. I should know more sometime early next week."
On the morning of January 27, 2012, a VDC representative and a representative of the landowner met with the city to discuss the Development. At that meeting, it was communicated to the city that the development is proposed for a site already zoned for multifamily residential near State Highway 78 and Woodbridge Parkway. Other details for the Development had not been determined specifically, but are still being evaluated by VDC.

On Friday the Sachse City Manager made an e-mailed statement that was posted on the on-line community groups, saying, "The program being applied for is administered at the state level through the TDHCA and not the city. At the city level, no applications have been made by VDC for any action or consideration. . . Comments and input addressed to the city regarding the notice and proposed Development are appreciated. However, unless an application is made to vary from the existing zoning or subdivision regulations, local City Council action is not required."

All TDHCA applications are scored on a wide variety of factors. There is a section within the 2012-2013 Qualified Allocation Plan and Related Laws and Rules called Quantifiable Community Participation. Points can awarded and/or subtracted for letters of support, neutrality or opposition by the following:
  • Neighborhood Organizations within the boundary of the proposed development (Woodbridge HOA).
    - Contact the Herzog Development Cooperation to express your opinions and concerns.
  • State Representative or Senator
    - Contact your State Senator and Representative ask them to approve or disapprove of the development. The alone can help the developer get the 16 points needed to move forward with the application.
  • There may be an opportunity for the following to support or oppose the development:
    - Superintendent of the school District (WISD)
    - Presiding officer of the board of trustees of the school district (WISD)
    - Mayor of any municipality containing the development (Sachse City)
    - All elected members of the governing body of the county
Some residents of Woodbridge have suggested forming a group to create a flier to take around to neighbors who may not have yet heard about the purposed housing.

Tea Party movement overwhelmingly supports Newt Gingrich, rejects Romney, Paul.

Yesterday Grassfire Nation, parent company of Liberty News Network, the self-proclaimed Tea Party news source, completed a GOP primary survey with 29,000 Tea Party respondents. The results suggest that nearly half of every tea party minded voter supports Newt Gingrich. The survey ran from January 23-25, 2012, following the South Carolina Primaries, and just in time for the Florida Primaries. The full results of the survey can be found here.

Another interesting aspect of the survey was the large dislike for Ron Paul, as noted by nearly 60% of these surveyed. The Tea Party obviously doesn't see him as supporting many of their conservative values that are important to this right winged portion of the republican party (though Paul would likely tell you, it's not that he doesn't support conservative values, but rather then he doesn't believe it's the Federal Governments responsibility to enforce them). Many people are even seeing Paul as nothing more than a Libertarian in the mist of the GOP. His son, Rand, on the other hand was elected to congress thanks to the Tea Party movement; who shares many similar political views as Paul.

Certainly this survey this adds fuel to Newt's fire for the upcoming Florida primary next Tuesday, but will this help dispel much of the mainstream media's apparent dislike for Newt? Certainly some people think so.

What is also pointed out by this survey is that conservative's overwhelmingly do not support Romney as their go to guy, but at the same time there seems to be a large number of more moderate republicans who do. There is a very obvious split in the Republican Party between conservatives and more main stream republicans. This begs the question as to if today's Republican Party is truly a conservative party, or if its only chance at victory is to be more appealing to middle of the road voters.

Gingrich, Santorum, and Romney, O my... all in South Carolina

What do Gingrich, Santorum, and Romney all have in common? Each has now gotten the largest number of primary or caucus votes in a state: South Carolina, Iowa, and New Hampshire respectively.

However, if you look at the actual delegate count, Gingrich has gone from almost nothing to front runner in just the last few weeks. The total pledged delegates now stand at:
However, if you also include the un-pledged delegates, Romney is actually ahead with 31 with Gingrich in second at 26. Gingrich's win may be attributed to Perry's endorsement after dropping out, and a rally cry by conservatives searching for a candidate to rally behind to defeat Romney. Huntsman, probably the least conservative of the bunch, also dropped out with an endorsement of Romney which likely didn't give him any help in the more conservative South Carolina.

In any case, the race is far from decided. It will require 1144 delegates to win the GOP nomination, and only a few relatively small states have given their input. It is certainly still anyone’s race to win, or lose as the case may be.

Here are some upcoming key dates to look forward to (some are subject to change):
  • Jan. 23 Republican debate in Tampa, Florida
  • Jan. 26 Republican debate in Jacksonville, Florida
  • Jan. 31 Florida primary
  • Feb. 4 Nevada caucus, Maine caucus begins (through Feb. 11)
  • Feb. 7 Colorado and Minnesota caucuses, Missouri primary
  • Feb. 11 Maine presidential caucus ends
  • Feb. 22 Republican debate in Mesa, Arizona
  • Feb. 28 Arizona and Michigan primaries
  • March 1 Republican debate in Georgia
  • March 3 Washington caucuses
  • March 6 “Super Tuesday” primaries and caucuses, including: Ohio, Massachusetts, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Idaho, Alaska, and North Dakota.
  • March 19 Republican debate in Portland, Oregon
  • April 3 District of Columbia, Maryland, Texas, and Wisconsin Primaries.
  • June 5 California, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota, and New Jersey Primaries.
  • Aug. 27-30 Republican convention in Tampa, Florida
  • Sept. 3-6 Democratic convention, Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Oct. 3 Presidential debate in Denver, Colorado
  • Oct. 11 Vice presidential debate in Danville, Kentucky
  • Oct. 16 Presidential debate in Hempstead, New York
  • Oct. 22 Presidential debate in Boca Raton, Florida
  • Nov. 6 Election Day

Revolution on the internet, or will laws like SOPA and PIPA take them down?

Ever since I got my first computer, and started using a modem (Modulator-Demodulator) to dial up to other computers and communicate using BBS's (Bulletin Board Systems), I've thought the next revolution, and future of politics and business would be a collaborative effort done through on-line communication. Today I believe we've all see the beginning of that while major Internet sites like Google, and Wikipedia, and others protested the SOPA and PIPA bills with “blackouts”.

While old school politicians continue to attempt to bow down to their old buddies on K Street to stop what they perceive to be a threat to their old way of doing business, the new and upcoming generation of internet savvy and ever connected, technology driven people let them know otherwise. In the government’s attempt to control and regulate the internet, in the name of stopping piracy and keeping us all safe from scammers, they sought the power to take down internet sites deemed as threatening. But threatening according to whom? As the new generation continues to threaten the old school establishments, we can expect to see more conflicts like this one as those in power attempt to stay in power by attaching the new ways of thinking, collaborating, communicating, and doing business.

Eventually something will have to give. Eventually the old school will grow even older and retire; moving out of the way to allow the newer generations to come into their own, and do what they know how to do best; collaborating with their friends and businesses via all sorts of electronic communications media. On-line services like Facebook, Twitter, and others will allow for new ways for people to do things such as vote. Imagine if voting was simply a matter of "liking" or supporting and discontinue support for those who represent you; making elections obsolete and participation much easier.

If a truly collaborative world government where to be formed over the internet, would it even require such divisions of power such as those found in the U.S. Constitution? True collaboration allows people to self-organize into self-governing groups that would inherently be a separation of powers, responsibilities, as well as spreading the risk to all participants; ultimately leading to a new way of dividing up the governance and power. With that in mind it seems that it would be better to "Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar’s", and instead build something completely new, something better, that would let current governments and organizations stay as they are, or do as they may, while inviting them to participate within this new collaborative world government.

New Hampshire primary results for GOP 2012 race, and who's leading

Mitt Romney wins again, and this time with a much greater lead in percentages, but when looking at the Delegate count, according to CNN they are as follows:
  • Romney 14
  • Santorum 7
  • Gingrich & Perry & Huntsman 2
  • Bachmann OUT
Despite efforts by the Tea Party and Gingrich to discredit Romney with negative adds, after his Iowa win, Romney still pulls out a large lead with Ron Paul at his heals.



Here's a list of some important upcoming dates for the GOP primaries:
  • Jan. 16 Republican debate in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  • Jan. 19 Republican debate in Charleston, South Carolina
  • Jan. 21 South Carolina primary
  • Jan. 23 Republican debate in Tampa, Florida
  • Jan. 26 Republican debate in Jacksonville, Florida
  • Jan. 31 Florida primary
  • Feb. 4 Nevada caucus, Maine caucus begins (through Feb. 11)
  • Feb. 7 Colorado and Minnesota caucuses, Missouri primary
  • Feb. 11 Maine presidential caucus ends
  • Feb. 22 Republican debate in Mesa, Arizona
  • Feb. 28 Arizona and Michigan primaries
  • March 1 Republican debate in Georgia
  • March 3 – Washington caucuses
  • March 6 “Super Tuesday” primaries and caucuses, including: Ohio, Massachusetts, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Idaho, Alaska, and North Dakota.
  • March 19 Republican debate in Portland, Oregon
  • April 3 District of Columbia, Maryland, Texas, and Wisconsin Primaries.
  • June 5 California, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota, and New Jersey Primaries.
  • Aug. 27-30 Republican convention in Tampa, Florida
  • Sept. 3-6 Democratic convention, Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Oct. 3 Presidential debate in Denver, Colorado
  • Oct. 11 Vice presidential debate in Danville, Kentucky
  • Oct. 16 Presidential debate in Hempstead, New York
  • Oct. 22 Presidential debate in Boca Raton, Florida
  • Nov. 6 Election Day

Does Iowa’s caucus predict a win for Romney in 2012? What's the aftermath?

EDIT: The original count was wrong, and the real winner is Rick Santorum with 25%, closely followed by Mitt Romney with 25%, and Ron Paul with 21%; however, they all still have the same number of delegates, so it seems to not be such a big deal after all...


The Results are in and Mitt Romney wins by a hair in the 2012 Iowa Caucus. With only 8 more votes over Rick Santorum, and Ron Paul only a few percentage behind them both, making this the closest Iowa Caucus in history. In reality though, all three received exactly 7 delegates each, for a 3 way tie; the GOP race is starting out to be a very close one.




The Iowa Caucuses are commonly recognized as the first step in the U.S. presidential nomination process for both the Democratic and the Republican Parties. They came to national attention in 1972 with a series of articles in The New York Times on how non-primary states choose their delegates for the national conventions. However, historically speaking, the winner of the Iowa Caucus has been a poor predictor of who will become president. For example:

In 1980, George H. W. Bush campaigned extensively in Iowa, defeating Ronald Reagan, but ultimately failed to win the nomination. In 1988, the candidates who eventually won the nominations of both parties came in third in Iowa. In elections without a sitting president or vice president, the Iowa winner has gone on to their party's nomination only about half the time. The only non-incumbent candidates to win their party's Iowa caucus and go on to win the general election were George W. Bush in 2000 and Barack Obama in 2008. Even Bill Clinton didn't win Iowa prior to his first terms.

Iowa also only has 28 Republican delegates, only about 1% of the total GOP delegates, that will participate in the 2012 national convention. Still the Iowa caucuses are watch very closely as an early indication of which candidates for president might win the nomination, and which ones should drop out for lack of support. This unfortunately has the tendency to undermine the opinions of much larger states, such as California (172), Texas (155), and New York (95). Iowa's in 39th place in order of most to least, and New Hampture (12) is in 52nd, right next to all the small U.S. island territories. So why does the GOP allow such a small percentage of delegates predict the front runners?

At least our own Texas Governor Rick Perry, had the sense to announced he was returning home to re-assess his candidacy after a disappointing fifth-place finish; yet ultimately decided to stay in the race, despite the very little support I've seen from this area of his own state. Michele Bachmann decided to drop out after her very poor 6th place finish, but at the same time Jon Huntsman has been focusing more on New Hampture; certainly hoping his 7th place finish in Iowa will be of no consequence. Newt on the other hand has decided to come out of this first round swinging at Mitt; very reminiscent of Huckabee's reasoning for refusing to concede in 2008.

Here are some upcoming key dates to look forward to (some are subject to change):
  • Jan. 7 Republican debate in Manchester, New Hampshire
  • Jan. 8 Republican debate in Concord, New Hampshire
  • Jan. 10 New Hampshire primary
  • Jan. 16 Republican debate in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  • Jan. 19 Republican debate in Charleston, South Carolina
  • Jan. 21 South Carolina primary
  • Jan. 23 Republican debate in Tampa, Florida
  • Jan. 26 Republican debate in Jacksonville, Florida
  • Jan. 31 Florida primary
  • Feb. 4 Nevada caucus, Maine caucus begins (through Feb. 11)
  • Feb. 7 Colorado and Minnesota caucuses, Missouri primary
  • Feb. 11 Maine presidential caucus ends
  • Feb. 22 Republican debate in Mesa, Arizona
  • Feb. 28 Arizona and Michigan primaries
  • March 1 Republican debate in Georgia
  • March 3 – Washington caucuses
  • March 6 “Super Tuesday” primaries and caucuses, including: Ohio, Massachusetts, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Idaho, Alaska, and North Dakota.
  • March 19 Republican debate in Portland, Oregon
  • April 3 District of Columbia, Maryland, Texas, and Wisconsin Primaries.
  • June 5 California, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota, and New Jersey Primaries.
  • Aug. 27-30 Republican convention in Tampa, Florida
  • Sept. 3-6 Democratic convention, Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Oct. 3 Presidential debate in Denver, Colorado
  • Oct. 11 Vice presidential debate in Danville, Kentucky
  • Oct. 16 Presidential debate in Hempstead, New York
  • Oct. 22 Presidential debate in Boca Raton, Florida
  • Nov. 6 Election Day

The Saddle Up Texas 2012 Straw Poll - Jan 12-14, Huston Texas

The 2012 Saddle Up Texas Straw Poll initiative is trying to provide constitutionally-grounded Texans a voice in the 2012 Presidential Primary race before the traditional bias of the early caucus/primary States sets in.

The three-day straw poll will take place January 12 -14 at Minute Maid Park, in Houston, Texas. This even is geared towards Texas GOP voters, and will include speeches by Republican presidential candidates, followed by a straw poll on Saturday. It will also give attendees the opportunity to obtain political action training, and hear inspirational themes from conservative speakers and leaders from around the nation.
Music will also be provided by Kevin Black and Karl Brunig, along with some highly endorsed food! Profits from this event will go to area veterans organizations, such as the Texas Wounded Warrior and the Lone Survivor Foundation, and Get Out The Vote efforts.

Some of the Speakers will include:

Herman Cain

Dick Armey, FreedomWorks

Matt Kibbe, FreedomWorks

David Dewhurst, Candidate for U.S. Senate

Ted Cruz, Candidate for U.S. Senate

Lela Mae Pittenger, Candidate for U.S. Senate

Tom Leppert, Candidate for U.S. Senate

Glenn Addison, Candidate for U.S. Senate

Doc Joe Agris, Candidate for U.S. Senate

Kevin Brady, US House Rep

Ted Poe, US House Rep

Louie Gohmert, US House Rep

Dan Patrick, Texas State Senator

David Simpson, Texas State House

Tito Munoz, Founder of the Conservative Hispanic Coalition PAC and Columbian immigrant

Karen DeSimone, Founder of Truth for American Teens and guest on Glenn Beck

KrisAnne Hall, Disabled Veteran and Conservative Speaker