Tom Leppert meets with Brighter Dallas to speak on campaign for US Senate

Tonight, May 24th, a group of young professionals got together at Dee Lincoln's Tasting Room & Bubble Bar to listen to Tom Leppert, former Dallas City Mayor, speak about his campaign for the Texas GOP Senate nomination. The Brighter Dallas group, a political action committee in Dallas, Texas, put on this meeting as just one of a number of events aimed at promoting "social and political awareness throughout the city".

Tom Leppert at Dee Lincoln's Tasting Room & Bubble Bar
Tom Leppert - By Seth Hollist

Tom Leppert, a self-proclaimed conservative businessman, certainly touted an impressive resume of turning around the Turner Corporation construction company, and credits himself with the company earning more profits during his seven year as C.E.O. than in the company's previous 97 years combined. He also spoke of turning around the Dallas City operations during his time as Mayor; however, in both cases he also admits that a good economy helped make these accomplishments possible. Some of his opponents, however, say he's actually very "liberal".
He also spoke about Medicare and the need for improvements in our economy, and the $75 trillion in debt and unfunded liabilities our nation currently carries. Without a strong economy, he noted, nothing else matters as the U.S. will no longer be the world leader; suggesting we will also not be able to solve these problems with first improving the economy. He also mentioned the move towards Socialism as a cliff that once we've gone over it, we will never come back. He gave an estimate of about 6-8 years left to save our country from these unwanted fates, and said if he couldn't fix the problems in a single 6 year term as Senator, he deserves to be replaced. In any case he vowed for no more than 2 terms as a Senator; something he also said none of his two main opponents had even mentioned.
Mayor Leppert talked about his ideas around saving Social Security through creating what seemed like an elaborate system of tiers based on the person's age. It included insuring retired and soon to retire people get what they were promised, while allowing the younger people to put their contributions into a private account that cannot be touched by the government that has already "barrowed" trillions from the program. He also noted that originally very few people received Social Security because the qualification age was beyond the average person's life expectancy when it was implemented and proposed upping the qualification age to 70, and giving incentives those who continue work and wait to claim benefits.
Afterwards the attendees spent some time mingling and sharing stories and political views, and a few of them won gift cards from a raffle. Overall the event seemed to have been enjoyed by all, and will likely be considered a great success.

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